Making Live TV With Google Glass

Google Glass wasn’t built for broadcasting live TV. We don’t know if any other television station has attempted it.

What is it?  Google Glass is a wearable, voice-controlled computer with an optical head-mounted display and built in video camera. Glass delivers an augmented reality image to the wearer. It can search the internet, answer dictated questions, take pictures, and record video.

WRAL Traffic Anchor Brian Shrader wearing Google Glass

WRAL Traffic Anchor Brian Shrader wearing Google Glass

The question was: could it be used to broadcast live TV?

WRAL-TV, the CBS affiliate in Raleigh, NC,  and parent company Capitol Broadcasting Company have a legacy of innovation. We LOVE a challenge like this one.

It started by registering with Google as a developer to try to get our hands on the technology. That was taking too long, so WRAL engineer Tony Gupton suggested we get them the way anyone gets the most obscure of objects: eBAY! WRAL Chief of Engineering and Operations Pete Sockett scored and the race was on. How quickly could we learn how it works, figure out how to route the video signal from it to live TV, brainstorm and implement a plan for a continuous live feed for WRAL.com, design on air and web graphics, put together a 4 day broadcast plan, develop and launch a marketing plan to promote the weeklong #WRALGlass event? The answer: 5 days. It takes a village, people.

WRAL Engineer Tony Gupton was lead teacher and problem solver.

WRAL Engineer Tony Gupton was lead teacher and problem solver.

WRAL Director James Ford and Lead Designer Steve Loyd work on presentation

WRAL Director of News Operations James Ford and Lead Designer Steve Loyd work on presentation.

WRAL Traffic anchor Brian Shrader learning to operate Google Glass

WRAL Traffic anchor Brian Shrader learning to operate Google Glass.

WRAL Director of News Operations James Ford setting up the switcher.

WRAL Director of News Operations James Ford setting up the switcher.

Output of WRAL control room #1 put Glass on TV, output of WRAL control room #2 streamed continuous output from Glass on WRAL.com.

Output of WRAL control room #1 put Glass on TV, output of WRAL control room #2 streamed continuous output from Glass on WRAL.com. TV viewers saw a picture in picture display.

Once we had the technology and were figuring out how to operate it, we had to decide what to do with it on air. WRAL Station Manager Jim Rothschild had the idea to have different members of the morning team wear Glass so viewers could see and hear different points of view.

WRAL’s 30-year veteran Morning News anchor Bill Leslie broke the news that he would be first.

@wralbleslie breaks the news on twitter

@wralbleslie breaks the news on twitter

Bill’s viewpoint gave the audience a chance to see what Bill sees, from the crew chief’s directions, to three robotic cameras, to his co-anchors eating snacks during the commercial breaks. Day one of the #WRALGlass experiment was an eye opener! Bill’s commentary was priceless and we learned that head movements are really exaggerated with Glass.

Watch and listen to news anchor Bill Leslie’s live eye view

Viewers rarely ever see or hear the studio crew chief, or even know what his job is. WRAL’s Stuart Todd promised managers a “show” when he stepped up to take on #WRALGlass and he delivered.

Watch and listen to crew chief Stuart Todd’s live eye view

During a live newscast, the producer is like air traffic control landing six planes at once. WRAL producer Kianey Carter’s day in #WRALGlass will make you appreciate the quick thinking, clear headed, multitaskers that these folks are. Rockstars behind the scenes!

Watch and listen to producer Kianey Carter’s live eye view

Finally, WRAL traffic anchor Brian Shrader, the sparkplug of WRAL’s morning news, a bundle of energy and fun.

Watch and listen to traffic anchor Brian Shrader’s live eye view

Here’s a combined stream of what viewers saw on air and what viewers simultaneously saw on WRAL.com:

http://www.wral.com/wral-tv/video/13379681/

Because so many people don’t know what Google Glass is or what it does, we took a conversational approach to the TV promotion, using the news anchors to demonstrate it. We also felt it was important to show viewers what they’d be seeing during the broadcast. We created web ads to promote #WRALGlass on WRAL.com. We generated more than 480k impressions on twitter using #WRALGlass and got some national press for the experiment.

Article in Broadcasting & Cable     Article in TVNewscheck

Overall, a win for innovation and a win for viewers to see a whole new perspective of local television news through Google Glass.

UPDATE on Feb 17, 2014: WRALTechWire Article

UPDATE on Feb 18, 2104: Stats just in from WRAL.com show 11,000 online video views of WRAL’s Google Glass experiment.

2 thoughts on “Making Live TV With Google Glass

  1. Loved getting to see how Google Glass works through you all at WRAL Shelly. Thanks for the recap here on your blog too. I was actually amazed that the station kept it rolling with the storm last week. I found it to be even that more interesting! Behind the scenes, all the new stuff, that’s what make WRAL such a hip and happening station. I can only imagine being young again (but alas, I am not) and starting out…that is where I would want to be!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks Kat! We considered shutting it down when the snow came but thought it might be even more interesting for the viewer to see us in a big coverage situation. Glad you enjoyed it! It’s such a gas to work in a place willing to experiment and try things no one has done yet. I’m approaching my 27th year, so you know I love it!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s